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British Red Cross Session

By Julie Duodu (Trailblazer GP 2019/20)

21/02/2020

Today we were illuminated about and humbled by the incredible work undertaken by the British Red Cross. 

This session was delivered by the incredible and passionate Susan Morley, whom is a fabulous ambassador for The British Red Cross as a whole and in particular the South Yorkshire branch.

The session started with a thoughtful quiz which deftly demonstrated how the tapestry of British heritage both past and present is full of migration and how several migrants and their descendants whom would be classed as refugees today have massively contributed to our society and culture. In essence “refugees are ordinary people caught up in extraordinary situations”.

It was incredibly helpful to revise the relevant terminology and to consider the small proportion of refugees who come to the UK and the countries they have originated from in recent years.

I really appreciated how Susan broke down the asylum process, and the expectations and restrictions placed on those seeking asylum in the UK. It gives me greater insight into what some of my patients are enduring and it must take a toll psychologically. The uncertainty, the legal minefield and the threat of being detained along the way, must be greatly unsettling and disturbing to say the least. It was useful to learn about the assistance the Red Cross gives at each stage, be it linking clients up with Solicitors and accessing legal help, helping people better understand the asylum process themselves and what evidence to gather, financial or practical support to plug the gaps the £37:50 per person per week or less (or in failed asylum cases, non at all) does not reach, such as transportation to mandatory sign in sessions at the Home Office etc. It was great to learn how the Red Cross links in with other charities and organisations whom work to help people settle in the UK and navigate the whole tumultuous process of seeking asylum and beyond. This includes helping those seeking asylum to access health and social services, accessing English language lessons and activities to look after wellbeing such as involvement in volunteering.

It was interesting to find out the other arms of the organisation- family tracing, health and welfare, attestation of detention and the “trace the face” an innovative means to help people find loved ones whom have become separated and out of touch. It was heart-warming to see how the hard work of the organisation can get people back in touch with each other.

This was an incredibly informative session. I previously had been aware of the work of the British Red Cross on the ground in places of conflict or in refugee camps. It was interesting to learn about the hard work which takes place here in the UK in the various strands of the organisation. This session and the improved comprehension of what those seeking asylum have to endure is bound to pay dividends through my increased awareness and empathy towards patients for whom this is a current inescapable reality. I am grateful for this and hope to further put into practice the message of the British Red Cross and its message about the power of kindness.

With thanks to the Susan Morley and the South Yorkshire British Red Cross team for facilitating this session.

By TrailblazerGPs

These blogs are from current and past Trailblazer GPs - newly qualified GPs working in areas of poverty supported by the fairhealth trailblazer scheme

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